HR leadership is in an excellent position to amplify it’s already valued skill sets. Nevertheless, several factors are holding them back. Among these, we have things like a lack of resources, which restricts them to having to focus only on existing processes.

In this quickly changing business environment, HR leaders have an opportunity to play a more engaging role in leadership. Employee-driven innovation has a much higher degree of influence than it did in the past, meaning that HR leaders have become a strategic asset within every organization. It implies that they also need to rethink how they drive value from their staff, both concerning how the employees see the workplace and how innovation is steadily shifting towards employee capability building.

Despite these significant and widespread trends, many HR leaders rarely, if ever, implement their innovation efforts. As expected, this represents a tremendous missed opportunity for both themselves and their business. 

Why Are HR Leaders so Slow to Adapt?

HR leadership is in an excellent position to amplify it’s already valued skill sets. Nevertheless, several factors are holding them back. Among these, we have things like a lack of resources, which restricts them to having to focus only on existing processes.

It could also be because the shift is too significant, or that they do not have a voice within the organization to make the changes possible. For innovation to indeed take root within a company, all parts need to take responsibility and given a fair share of ownership.  

There can be numerous other such reasons why HR leadership is not taking the necessary action, but all end up with the same result — a stifled innovation, less control, and less decision power.

The Necessary Steps 

Some steps can be taken by HR leaders to counteract this and embrace a more innovation-driven agenda. Depending on the nature of the industry and the needs of the individual company, some of these may be more applicable and relevant than others. 

  • HR leaders can contribute to innovation by examining academia, science, and other similar industries for insight, inspiration, and network development.
  • Leveraging the right kind of technology will not only simplify and automate many time-consuming, day-to-day operations, it can also drive cross-functional collaboration and the creation of new ideas.
  • HR leaders can also build better processes that ensure the most qualified employees will implement the best ideas. It is done by redistributing and securing employee resources where they are most needed.
  • Current or new communication channels can be used to increase employee awareness about various trends impacting the organization.
  • Various employee training programs can be created to highlight new idea-development processes and innovation activities.
  • Innovation is quickly becoming an asset for many organizations. As a result, HR leaders should present innovation-related metrics to both investors and customers, as a means of aligning themselves with a value-creation culture.
  • Redesigning internal processes can also make it much quicker and easier for new ideas to develop.
  • When innovation becomes a core driver for an organization, new models can be better incorporated to help the company move forward. It is why HR teams should help realign business objectives, talent acquisition, and other initiatives with innovation-driven policies.

Conclusion

Innovation is quickly becoming the differentiating factor between a business that’s successful and one that is not. For this reason, HR leaders should take the opportunity to engage in a more proactive role and support any innovation efforts. Over time, they can become marginalized, or even risk becoming completely obsolete. 

Question to reflect: have our HR leaders an innovation agenda in mind? Have they already an action plan?

What do you think?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.